HAY HOLLOW

Noah Glassburn was called to see his sick father near Richmondale this week.
Dolly Batters of Chillicothe has been visiting relatives at this place the past week.
The people of this place have been attending the Holiness protracted meeting near Mount Sinai.
David Coy has been talking of taking violin lessons.
Frank Hamm of Straight Creek was at this place buying fur.
David Glassburn of Richmondale is going to move on his farm at this place soon.
Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Ina Anderson a baby daughter.
Thomas Anderson of Columbus will hold a protracted meeting at this place in February.
Frank Hartley was calling on friends at Richmondale Sunday night.
John Haynes and Guy Zimmerman were seen duck hunting near Mt. Sinai Sunday night.
J. A. Wolf and wife were visiting on Hixon Run Sunday.
J. R. Stoll is holding a protracted meeting at Liberty Hill this week.
Parker Quincel was seen on his same old trail Sunday Sunday night.
Clarence Johnson was seen passing through here the other day with his rifle and coon dog.
Alf Detillion is on the sick list with rheumatism.
Lizze Glassburn of Omega was visiting relatives at this place Sunday.
James Houser was calling on Millard Forcht Sunday night.
Jacob Coy and wife were visiting relatives.  28 Jan 1909 The News

SINAI

B.F. Ragland has turned the books over to the new Justice. Lawrence Gansheimer, of this place.
James Sprague Jr. is operating the Maple coal mine while will Maple is still delivering coal to the different school districts.
Isaac Wickline, an old civil war veteran, who has been critical ill. is much better at this writing.
Peter Lew, our newly elected assistant assessor, is crushing and grinding feed for his neighbor. this winter, with his new gasoline engine.
The revival meeting at Germany closed last week with little interest taken.
Floyd Anderson, the soldier boy of the world war was taking the census here last week.
There is considerable feeling her in the change of the ox law passed by the spots. No difference to them if the farmers and land owners loose all their chickens, lambs and pigs so they have a good time.

22 Jan 1920 The Republican Harold

 

Chimney Rock located on Hixon Run Across the road from Maple's store

Two Men Pose on Top of Chimney Rock, located on Hixon Run, Pike Co. 1907

Tombstone located in Grandview Cemetery, Sec E Row 6.  Note: I believe the death year should be 1954 as the newspaper story is in 1954.  Oldest son Edgar is also buried in Sec. E Row 6 (6 Apr 1881-23 Mar 1961)

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 Maple Store on Hixon

HELD ON SERIOUS CHARGE

While Rev. George Maple and wide, of Jackson township, were enroot to church on Sunday morning they claim that two colored men stopped their machine and made an attack upon them with a hammer. Rev. Maple cast aside his ministerial dignity and knocked one of the men down and the other one made his escape Sheriff Ernest Dowdle and Deputy William Anderson were called to the scene of the trouble and arrested one of the colored men who was connected with the trouble. He gave his name as Arthur Nelson and his home at Columbus. He will be arraigned later before Squire T. A. Brown on a charge of assault and battery. Other arrests will probably follow as officers have now learned the identity of the other assailant.  9 Aug 1928 The Republican Herald

German Chapel church  (Pleasant Hill Church) interior with song books still laying on the mourners bench, on Whiskey Run, Jackson Twp., Pike Co., Ohio

photo by Tyrone Hemry 2 December 2016

Jackson Twp. North East Corner

Hixon

The colored people in the Hixon School District in Jackson Township are taking measures to procure a public school for the education of their children. Mr. Samuel Johnson assures that their are twenty colored children in the district who would attend regularly if one is allowed them. They ought, by all means, to have the school. Ohio cannot afford to have her children come up to manhood and womanhood ignorant of the public school-books.  31 Dec 1868 The Pike County Republican 

HAY HOLLOW AND VICINITY

  Sandy's emissaries are busy in this section drumming up the faithful.  They seem to have plenty of money.  Have not heard what they are paying for votes; but have heard that $2.50 is the minimum price so far....Geo. Anderson seems to be doing a thriving business....Dave Wickline and John Kuntzman have gone north to husk corn.  The corn fields of Ross and Pickaway counties are full of Pike county voters, this fall....Charles Coe, who has been working at Wellston, has returned home.   26 Oct. 1899 The Courier Watchman

HELD ON SERIOUS CHARGE

 While Rev. George Maple and wide, of Jackson township, were enroot to church on Sunday morning they claim that two colored men stopped their machine and made an attack upon them with a hammer. Rev. Maple cast aside his ministerial dignity and knocked one of the men down and the other one made his escape Sheriff Ernest Dowdle and Deputy William Anderson were called to the scene of the trouble and arrested one of the colored men who was connected with the trouble. He gave his name as Arthur Nelson and his home at Columbus. He will be arraigned later before Squire T. A. Brown on a charge of assault and battery. Other arrests will probably follow as officers have now learned the identity of the other assailant. 9 Aug 1928 The Republican Herald

German Chapel church  (Pleasant Hill Church) on Whiskey Run, Jackson Twp., Pike Co., Ohio
photo by Tyrone Hemry 2 December 2016

SUNNY RIDGE

Rev. J. R. Stoll is holding a revival meeting at Pleasant Hill at the present time.
Mrs. J. H. Mc Coy dismissed school for two weeks and went to Latham to-take care of her mother-in-law who is ill.
Phillip Palmer and wife were the guests of George Hahn and family Sunday.
Miss Lena and Guy Coy are home from Akron where they have been employed.
Several from East Jackson attended the dance at Omega last Wednesday night all reporting a nice evening.
Last Thursday morning about 4 o'clock, W. H. Sprague's smoke house was destroyed by fire, the origin of the fire is unknown.
Joseph Accord and wife, of Spite Run and Mrs. Mary Rapp and baby of Omega were the guest of J. W. Overly Sunday.
Lewis Gansheimer and family have returned to Chillicothe after spending two weeks visit with parents of this place
Otto Moore of near Beaver spent a few days last week with Clarence Wickline of this place.  8 Jan 1920 The Republican Harold.

                                      William H. Woods
   Friends here have received word of the death of William H. Woods, 50, in Columbus on Saturday morning, following a four month illness.  
   Mr. Woods was born in Boyd County, Ky., in 1890, a son of Edward and Mollie Riley Woods.
   Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Bessie Woods, of Mount Rose, West Va., three daughters, Mrs. Virginia Blossor, and Mrs. Geneva Woods, of Mount Rose, West Va., Mrs. Freda Woods, of New York; three brothers, Earl, of Columbus, Arthur, of Huntington, West Va., and Howard, of Chillicothe, rfd 2, and eight grandchildren.
   Funeral services were held Tuesday at two p.m. at the home of Rev. G. B. Reed, Hay Hollow.  Interment was in the Hay Hollow Cemetery under the direction of the A. H. Boyer Funeral Home.
                                                               October 6, 1949 Republican Herald

ALLEN RIDGE

    The long drought was broken on Monday night by a most refreshing shower, which continued throughout the greater portion of the next day.  It was badly needed.
    The prospects are not good for a plentiful supply of winter apples, in this neighborhood.  In the early spring we thought we would have winter apples to throw at the birds after I had sold enough to buy my winter groceries, but on inspecting the trees we find they are drying up and falling off.  The cold snap during February, followed by the drought, played the mischief with winter apples.
    J. W. Overly and John DeLong, were absent on business, last week.
    Maud Overly was visiting her parents last Sunday.
    Our school under the management of Charles Coy is making rapid progress.
    A wedding occurred on the ridge Saturday night, further notice of which will be given next week.
    Albert Overly was seen wandering along the meanderings of Jackson run, on last Sunday night.
    There are five boys on Hixon run who make their living sitting on the fence.
    Notwithstanding the wholesale slaughter of rabbits last winter, they are yet numerous enough to be a downright pest to farmers in the uplands.  They not only destroy young trees, but help themselves to the best there are the gardens.  They are great nocturnal ramblers, and on moonlight nights scores of them may be seen cutting up the most laughable antics imaginable.  A few years ago the Legislature passed a law exempting them form protection; but as we destroy the foxes, owls and hawks, and other natural enemies of the rabbit, they multiply with astonishing rapidity.   21 Sep 1899 The Courier Watchman

SINAI

Christmas turkeys were very scarce in this country more on the account them wondering away when the foxes take and carry them to their young.
It has been reported that the colored people are having a great revival at the Big Rock church. Many conversions and much good being done.
Albert Overly of the Fairview Farm, passed through here Saturday , gliding over the ice, headed for his brother Edgar's near German church.
The Cotterell brothers, Orland and Virgil Maple, of this place, attended the meeting at the Big Rock Sunday night and returned at a late hour.
Herbert Cotterell lost on of his young cattle one day last week by it falling on the ice.
The Hahn brothers near Germany church, entertain their young friends these long evenings with their new graphaphone.
Edgar Overly, our blacksmith, has been kept very busy since the ice has come, shoeing horses before they can be put on the road.
Mrs. Gansheimer, who has been ill for some time, gets better, then worse. We all hope for the best.
George Maple, of Richmondale, was a business caller at this place one day last week.
Our old friend and comrade, Isaac Wickline, is recovering nicely from a serous illness. Dr. Wills was the attending physician.
The heavy ice has fixed all our election mud holes in and around this burg.
It has been suggested that when the sportsmen hold their conventions that they give the farmers a general invitation to attend those meetings.
                                                                                  29 Jan 1920 The Republican Harold

  Grandma Knight says she's having hard luck.  She can't work as much as she used to...gets short of breath when she stoops over.
     And it's a shame that one so young shouldn't be able to do productive labor.  You see, Grandma is only 106.
    With the exception of her self-diagnosed "asthma" Mrs. Hesterline Knight is in perfect health.  And if she isn't the oldest person in Ohio it's sure thing she can out-cook, out-talk, and out-run any other centenarian.
     Grandma's condition--and there's no question of her age--is so good as to be a near-phenomenon.
     She walks without aid of a cane, has never owned a pair of glasses and can hear as well and talk as loudly and sensibly as anyone.
     Her left arm--broken three times--is a little stiff but she still is active enough to bake occasional cakes and pies and goes outdoors...without a coat...at least twice a day to feed the chickens and a pet duck.
        MRS. KNIGHT lives in a three room farm home in Hay Hollow, northern Pike county, with her oldest son, Edgar (he's only 80), her youngest son , Charlie Jr., 54, a grandson, Tommy, 9, and Mrs. Edith Knight, wife of another grandson who is serving in Korea.
     Until Edith came to live with the family about a year ago, Grandma was the "women of the house" and did all the work including rearing Tommy and getting him off to school.
     "Edith's been wonderful to me," Grandma says with pride, "but she'll be leaving soon and I'll have to take care of things myself.  And I'm not as young as I used to be."
      DOCTORS MIGHT attribute Grandma's long life to a toughening-up process of hard work, refusal to take life too seriously, and a will to remain useful.
     She's done about everything in her life.   
     She's worked in a saw mill, plowed, worked as a housekeeper and helped in the delivery of "at least a million" babies.  She delivered most of her own grandchildren without the aid of a doctor.
     "Nobody knew what it was to call a doctor in the old days just because someone was going to have a baby."
     The old days to Grandma Knight is the entire second half to the 19th century.  A family Bible shows she was born Dec. 15, 1847 in Augusta county, Virginia.
     A pleasant little woman with a perpetual smile, Grandma talks equally well about childhood remembrances of the civil war or the current high price of a pound of beef.
      SHE WAS A grown girl when the Civil War broke out and vividly remembers Union soldiers marching past her family home and killing cattle and pigs and hauling them away.
     "My family didn't have any slaves," she recalls, "but the neighbors did.  I remember Old Man Mickey had one that was plowing up on a hill and got sick.  The slave came down to rest under a tree and the old man beat  it to death.
     "There's been a lot of change in the world but I believe there's more in the last 30 years than in the first 76.  There are automobiles and airplanes and electricity and now this here television.  I still listen to the radio."
     She raise a garden every year until last summer when her "boy" refused to plow it for her.
     "He thinks I oughtn't to do anything," she says, "but I can't just sit around here all the time."
      GRANDMA HAS been a widow for 35 years and still draws a $30 a month pension because her husband was killed in a West Virginia mine accident.
     She was married only once and had 12 children.  In addition she had a sister that died and left five children and Grandma reared them too.
     Counting up her grandchildren, Mrs. Knight is pretty sure that 49 is correct.  she knows she has at least 26 great-grandchildren and doesn't know whether or not there are any yet of the fifth generation.
     "I've just been in Ohio seven years," she says, "and all my family is still in Virginia or West Virginia."
     Grandma Knight isn't at all concerned about living so long.  Her mother lived to 103 and her grandmother to 115.  In looks she could pass for 75, the most 85.  Her flesh is full and although slightly stooped, she gets about with no trouble.
     "There isn't but one thing I can't do," she says, "that's drive a car.  I think I'm too nervous for that."  11 Feb 1954 The Waverly Watchman