EAST JACKSON

To say the farmers here are in favor of a parcel post is not putting it strong enough.
Mrs. J. W. and Nellie Overly were the guest of Mrs. Maud Hartly last week.
Marton Hammon is moving from Piketon to his farm on Hixon Run.
Noah Glasburn has moved to his old home on Hayhollow.
Frank Zimmerman will give up the Shilders farm an move up north.
Grandma Hartley is slowly recovering.
Young boys and girls who want to go to church to stay there all night is the limit and should have a medal.
All we here now is Billy Sunday's revival at Portsmouth and Judge Blair's probe in Adams county.
Rev. J. R. Stoll of the Christian Union is now holding meetings at Limerick.
Ethel and Pluma Hartley of Jackson county attended church here Sunday evening.
Aunt Mag Boring has been ill with heart trouble.
Many thanks to friend who sent us the Portsmouth papers. We will guess is was George.
Our Superstitious people will note that the ground hog saw his shadow and went back to stay six weeks.
J. W. Hartley receives the Democrat every week, thank you.

15 February 1911 The Democrat

EAST JACKSON

Chas. Wickline was the first here to turn any sod for the spring crops.
Jacob Wolfe of Beaver was visiting his father, John Wolfe of Hixon Run, Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Will Maple were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Will Reisinger recently.
Albert Brammer, Frank Zimmerman, Nelson Overly and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Arch Wills and son, were guests at the Fair View home Sunday.
The body of John Grow, son of George Grow, of Jackson county was found dead in a creek in Kentucky and was brought home and buried at Limerick Sunday.
John Wolf who has been in poor health for the past three years is still very feeble.
Lesslie Whaley, who has been working in Chillicothe, was accidentally shot in the thigh with a target, in the hands of a seven year old lad. He is now at the home of his parents here.
Sheriff Givens was in this section last week, but he came to a goat's house for wool, for the victims took to tall timber.
The Overly brothers visited Al Brammer last week.
Joseph Bowman came near getting his house burned down last week when a chair and some clothing fell against a stove.
Mesdames J. W. Overly, A. J. Willis and Isaac Wickline were the guests of Mrs. Bowman one day last week.
Thomas Valentine, colored, a soldier of the civil war, was laid to rest at Sinai Sunday.  8 March 1911 The Democrat

Log Cabin Home as of 21 March 2009 built by Sam Simmons Grandfather, located in front of Carr's Run Cemetery on Carr's Run. Sam's mother and dad lived in it till they built the house on the hill across the road form the cabin. Sam and his wife lived in it for a while after they were married.  

photo by Tyrone Hemry

Jackson Twp. East Side

NEWMAN, SILAS P., " Ohio’s oldest soldier, has just died at his home in JacksonTownship. He was colored and was aged 102 years. He served in Co. K 42nd US INF. His widow, Mahala Newman, aged 75, applied for a widow’s pension Tuesday." The Waverly News

"A noticeable event of last week was the fact that Silas P. Newman, a colored man of Jackson Township, celebrated his 100th birthday last Friday. He was in town on Thursday and seems apparently to be in good health. He talked freely with several citizens and recounts, interesting, events that happened back in the days when he was a slave in the south." 10 Jul 1912 Waverly Democrat

Our thanks to the township trustees for putting the Silas tombstone on a concrete foundation summer (2006) as it had been sinking below the ground level.

Pictured are repairmen replacing the wooden floor of the bridge.  This bridge ca 1900's spanned the Scioto River from Omega to River Road.  This was the last bridge of this design built in Pike County.

.

Historical Study of the Negro in Jackson Township, Pike County Ohio

     The (African Americans ) who live in Jackson Township today are offspring from the slaves which migrated to this section of the country back in  the year 1823.
     Their primary purpose for leaving the South was to escape slavery, of course.  It is said that they came from Monroe County, VA.
     Their leader was Mr. Walker, a great grandfather of Cletis Jackson of Jackson Township.
     Mr. Walker was a school teacher and minister of the Baptist faith.  Most to the people who settled in this area were descendants from the Walkers or Raglands.
     Mr. Walker migrated from Virginia with 75 slaves. They had stopped only for sleep and long enough to prepare what food they had to eat.
     The reason for the African Americans to settle in this hilly land at this time was, because the land here was cheaper than it was in the Chillicothe area.
     The land in Jackson Township was around 50 cents an acre, but almost $50.00 an acre in the Chillicothe area.
     When the 75 slaves reached this area, they had no homes, clothing, money or anything else, except what they could carry.
     So, they used the old family get together plan and helped each other clear the land for crops and cut logs to construct their houses or some sort of shelter.
     In 1823, there were Indian not far from this area.  This made it necessary to secure protection from the Indians as well as wild animals.
     History tells us there were Indians in this territory until 1825.  This was just a few years after the Battle of Point Pleasant.  The War of 1812 had their troubles with the Indians, especially Tecumseh, who was chief of the Shawnee.
     There is no record of the Indians attacking the African Americans, but there is little doubt that there have been a few killed.
     These African Americans reached Ohio during the term served by Jeremiah Morrow, a Republican (not the present party as it was formed over 25 years later) from Warren County.
     Some of the activities going on in Ohio at this time were the great canals being constructed over the state including the Ohio and Erie, which was completed through Pike County in 1832.
     Small log houses were usually built in this county at that time.  The people had to grow all they wanted to eat.  They didn't have the money to buy everything (and many of our staple items of today were not even available.)
     These people raise corn, potatoes, one or two head of hogs. a few chickens and a cow if they were fortunate.
     There were no schools, churches or stores in this section.  Mr. Walker started a small school of his own in Jackson Township a few years later.
     He had a few books he had brought with him from Virginia.
     To explain the school a little more -- it was the teacher on one end of the log and the student on the other.
     He taught them reading, writing, arithmetic and possibly some geography.  Mr. Walker received no salary for the work conducting the school.

1 Jul 1959 Waverly News written by Paul Mendel Schrader a graduate of Beaver High School

EAST JACKSON

T. P.  Rush Hartley has to the surprise of every one sold his farm to William Maple giving possession this week. Mr. Hartley purchased the John Mead farm over in Jackson county and will move there. Mr. James Hartley was visiting his mother Mrs. Hartley Mrs. Charity Mickle at Jackson Saturday and Sunday. Mr. John Quincel of Hayhollow and Albert Overly of the Fairview Farm were business visitors at Richmondale Saturday. Mr. Fred Weaver and J. G. Sprague, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Maple spent Easter Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Overly. Mr. Rufus Morris, Jas. Wickline and Fred Tucker returned to the railroad Sunday evening. We omit the named for the present, of some children that mis-behave at church when their parents are not present. Miss Clay Atkins was the pleasant guest of Miss Pluma Hartley Sunday. Jasper Bowman was seen going in the direction of Willis Hartley Sunday. Sam Allen and Albert Cotrel was at Beaver on day last week. James Devers has been working on the Fairview farm for some time.Mr. and Mrs. Arch Willis attended church on the hill Sunday night. Dellie Hartley and Laura Wickline was in attendance at church here Sunday. John Barrens is farming on the Pass Wingo farm this season.  3 March1910 The Waverly Democrat

OLDEST RESIDENT IS DEAD

John Henry Staughter, colored, aged 110 year, said to have been the oldest resident of Pike County, passed away, Sunday night at nine o’clock at the Pike County Infirmary at Idaho, death being due to infirmities of age. Deceased who was a former resident of the Carr’s Run neighborhood in Jacksontownship, has been an inmate of the infirmary for the past several years. Staughter claimed to have been an ex-slave. The remains were claimed by his only surviving relative, a sister, Mrs. Mary Shreeves, of Ironton. The body was shipped to Ironton, Monday evening, where services were held, Tuesday and interment made in the Ironton cemetery."

3 Mar 1927The Republican Herald

     After the Scioto River lowlands were inundated during the 1913 flood, the imposing residence of the Newton Foster family near Omega was moved to higher ground where it is presently located. This picture was taken during the moving but workers are not identified. (From the collection of the late A. S. Keechle, Waverly) 14 Feb. 1979 Waverly Watchman

     When the house was located down by the river they had a team of horses hitched to the hitchen post by the house and the 1913 flood came through so quickly they were unable to get the hoses moved in time and they drowned.

     This house was raised somewhere around 130' to the top of a hill that is 700' above sea level from down near the Scioto river with an altitude of around 570'. What they did was to level a place on the hill side, jack the house up to a certain height then pull it over on to the flat area and then jack it up again and repeat the process until they got it to the top of the hill.

     Note the pictures shows the house to be jacked up about 3 men high. It would appear the process had to be done 8 or 9 times if they jacked it up to the height we see in the picture each time.

     I am told the family continued to live in the house during the moving process and not a picture fell off the wall. I am also told a mule was used to winch the house onto the flat places. The Foster house sets on the hill that is now reached by a drive way that is across from where Straight Creek road comes up to Rt. 335. (39 7.84'N 82 53.74'W)
    Bill Gildow, as a kid, use to deliver stuff from his Aunt Blazer's store to the two women who lived there. He said it was a very nice house inside.

   Foster #2 cemetery is also located on the top of this hill near the home.  Right now the wall of the cemetery can be seen as you go east a little before going through the C & O underpass on 335 because the hill side has been clear cut.

Big Rock

 

Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled

CO 1622 Allegheny - Largest Class on C&O Railroad at G. B. Cabin Coaling Station Omega

Looking North about 1 Mile north of G. B. Cabin Telegraph Station At Rt. 335 November 1950

Picture #CO1274 Courtesy of Chesapeake & Ohio Historical Society & Jim Henry

In 1947 The C&O completed their new coaling and watering station, called "GB" for their steam locomotives.  Within 10 years diesel-electric had replaced steam so the facility became unused.

EAST JACKSON

It has been reported that Mrs. Oral Irvine has the typhoid fever and Chas. Wickline's baby has been very low with summer complaint but is some better at this writing.
Mr. Sherman Maple was at this place one day last week.
Bunk Wickline passed this way Sunday enroute for Sinai.
V. A. Wills will soon move to his new home over near Limerick.
Rush Hartley has been going with his brother Frank's threshing machine for some time.
Mrs. Barnhart the Evangelist and her father from Troy closed a very interesting and profitable ten days meeting at Limerick Sunday night.
The Fairview people have a few apples and peaches this season.
Mr. and Mrs. Marian Tope, Mrs. Bell White and little daughter, and Me. E. Chipley and daughter Mrs. Barnhart of Troy were the pleasant guest at the Fairview home Tuesday.
The Christian Union Messenger and the Pike county Democrat are our most welcome weekly visitors.
The Waverly Fair is all the talk up here just now.  17 August 1910 The Democrat

EAST JACKSON

Many of our women here dread to see the men folks go to Chillicothe and you know and I know why they dread it: one saloon can raise more hell in a single township than all the churches, school houses, sheriffs and constables in any township.
The folks from this section are getting ready to attend the C. U. council which convenes at Union Chapel near Hillsboro Sept. 7, 8, 9, and 10, 1910.
The basket meeting at the Jerusalem C. U. church was well attended. Speakers were the Rev. Chas. Overly of Chillicothe, Rev. J. R. Stoll of this place and Rev. Pearl Barnhart the evangelist of Troy Ohio.
One of our wise councilors in order to evade the law has adopted a new method in delivering mail. He travels in the night season and by the star route and saves the two cents.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Overly accompanied the Troy people, M. E. Shipley and Mrs. Pearl Barnhart the Evangelist over to Givens Chapel last week and were guests of Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Bumgarner of that neighborhood.
Rev. Geo. Maple of near Sinai was a business visitor in this section last week. Geo. is delighted with his trip to the Niagara Falls and says he will go again next fall.
The Fairview people are about all that have all the fruit they need and some to spare.
William Maple is in another timber job up near Massieville.
Peter Boyer and son of Highland county, John Q. Elliott of Richmondale Ross county, J. W. Overly and Thomas Felton of this place took dinner at the Maple hotel Tuesday.
Trustee John Quincel of Hayh

1910 The Waverly Democrat

EAST JACKSON

James Deavers killed a large rattle snake near the Whiskey Run hill last week. It had 17 rattles and a button.
Mrs. Martha Wolfe, wife of the late John Wolfe, made a business visit to Gallia county last week.
Rev. Geo. Maple will hold a few day's meeting at Linn Hill School House in the near future.
Rev. F. Rose, who is at the home of his son-in-law is still very low.
The annual Big Rock meeting comes around next Sunday.
All interested will meet on Wednesday; Aug. 14 to reclean the Jerusalem cemetery. Some folks meet every Sabbath in the woods near a church and play "seven-up" all day and even into the night and call it personal liberty.
Edgar Davis who was killed by a train at Chillicothe was brought here for burial. Rev. Geo. Maple officiated.
An old-fashion Sunday school celebration and Basket meeting will be held at the Jerusalem C. U. Church, Saturday August 31. Come with well-filled baskets and stay all day. 7 August 1912 The Waverly Democrat

EAST JACKSON

Mother's day was appropriately celebrated here on the 12th Sunday. White flowers were worn for mother and the day devoted to the one whose love is surpassed in this world.
Many form this township went down to Waverly to see and hear "Teddy." It was too wet for them to do any work on the farm.
Rev. F. Rose, formerly of Jackson county and for several years resident of this place is very poorly at his daughter's Mrs. Geo. Anderson.
The members of the league frequently meet now on Hickory Knob.
Rev. J. R. Stoll preached on the Hill Sunday night.
Our Primary election was a very tame affair indeed up here.
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Rose of Big Stone Gap, W. Va. have been here visiting their uncle Rev. F. Rose who has been ill for some time.
Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Maple are the pleased parents of another Progressive Democrat boy.
Too much rain and past cool weather has caused our apples to fall considerable.
Bunk Wickline of Beaver passed through here enroute for his old home, last week, in East Jackson.
Rev. Geo. Maple and Jasper Bowman of Sinai were in this section one night last week on business.
Salvems Reisinger was the guest of his father, J. R. Reisinger one day last week.  29 October 1912 The Waverly Democrat

EAST JACKSON

Chas. Wickline was the first here to turn any sod for the spring crops.
Jacob Wolfe of Beaver was visiting his father, John Wolfe of Hixon Run, Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Will Maple were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Will Reisinger recently.
Albert Brammer, Frank Zimmerman, Nelson Overly and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Arch Wills and son, were guests at the Fair View home Sunday.
The body of John Grow, son of George Grow, of Jackson county was found dead in a creek in Kentucky and was brought home and buried at Limerick Sunday.
John Wolf who has been in poor health for the past three years is still very feeble.
Lesslie Whaley, who has been working in Chillicothe, was accidentally shot in the thigh with a target, in the hands of a seven year old lad. He is now at the home of his parents here.
Sheriff Givens was in this section last week, but he came to a goat's house for wool, for the victims took to tall timber.
The Overly brothers visited Al Brammer last week.
Joseph Bowman came near getting his house burned down last week when a chair and some clothing fell against a stove.
Mesdames J. W. Overly, A. J. Willis and Isaac Wickline were the guests of Mrs. Bowman one day last week.
Thomas Valentine, colored, a soldier of the civil war, was laid to rest at Sinai Sunday.  8 March 1911 The Democrat

            EAST JACKSON

Osa, son of W. H. Sprague, a small boy, while shooting birds from their cherry trees Thursday of last week accidentally shot himself in the arm. It was lucky for him that it was no worse as he had killed one and it had fell in a pile of brush, The boy took hold of the muzzle of his target and trying to hook the bird out with the breech the gun was suddenly discharged the ball entering the palm of his hand and was taken out above the elbow. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.
During the rain storm Sunday lightning struck the barn of J. W. Overly the bolt striking the comb near the gable running down and past a double door tearing off gable and door facing and within 6 or 8 feet of two horses they not being injured.
Mrs. A. J. Willis and Pluma Hartley were the guest at the Fairview home Sunday.
The high water Sunday was several inches up in V. A. Willis' store room.
Lute Sulivan and his best girl passed this way Monday.
Rufus Morris who is working for the railroad company at Portsmouth spent Sunday and Monday here.
Rev. and Mrs. Rose spent the 4th at their son-in-law's, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Anderson's
The Maple Bros. loaded another car of lumber at Richmondale Monday.
Lightning struck a granary for Joseph Hartley Saturday night and also killed a cow for Wm. Wingo at Sinai.
Rush Hartley and his boys are here cutting their wheat.
Sam Allen has been harvesting got john Keller near Sinai this week.
Jonathan Reisinger has had a lay off for a few days and is home with friends.
The heaviest rain fell here Saturday night and Sunday for a long time injuring plowed fields and highways and washing away bridges.
Wheat generally is better than our people expected some time ago.
Albert Cotrel was a business caller her Saturday.
Willis Hartley, James G. Sprague and Charles Wickline were cutting wheat for the Overly's Saturday.
J ohn McLaughlin is farming for Mrs. C. H. Willis this season. 13 July 1910 The Democrat

EAST JACKSON

William Yearian of Jackson county brought Mrs. Mirtle Coy home one day last week. Mrs. Coy has been staying for sometime with her son Edgar.
Victor Willis moved to hi new home over in Jackson county on day last week. A. J. Willis and son Willie have been up at Washington cutting corn.
William Sprague has another job of logging for Frank Hartley
Charles Wickline is sowing wheat on Rush Hartley’s farm over in Jackson county.
Pat Murphy is no more, he went to Chillicothe last week came to Richmondale on the
night train, and a short distance from town he lay there all night. When he woke up the next morning he went to Levi Hartley’s and died Tuesday.
Martin Hammon will move from Piketon back to his farm on Hixon Run this fall.
William Maple has rented wheat land from Albert Cotteral and is going to try his luck with the Overly Pool wheat.
Sam Allen and Henry Tucker are back from the north.
Mattie and Laura Wickline came from Jackson county to visit their parents Saturday.
Will Anderson and Maud Sullivan were quietly married last week over at Jackson court house by Squire Frank White.
The Maple Bros. loaded a car with cross ties Saturday at Richmondale.
It is said that a saloon keeper pays ½ cent per glass for beer and sells it for 5 cents so if our merchants made that profit here would be no kick.

26 Oct 1910 The Waverly Democrat

EAST JACKSON

Mr. J. W. Overly is in possession of a deer horn, the deer being killed by his father in 1867 on the Seimon farm in East Jackson township.
Mr. Wm. Swarts and son of Washington C. H. came down last week to take a hunt and visit relatives.
Mr. Arch Wills has returned from the north where he has been husking corn.
It is rumored that there will be a reunion at the Fairview home on Christmas day.
Albert Overly made a business trip to Jackson Saturday
Bunk Wickline of Beaver drove over Thursday and was the guest of friends on the ridge. A. J. Wills was a caller at the Fairview home, Wednesday.
Sleigh riding will be all the go here when Wm. Maple and Albert Overly get their sleighs completed.
V. A. Wills and James Cregg made a business visit to Beaver Saturday.
Rush Hartley is still selling coal for 5cts at his new bank over in Jackson county.
Thomas Felton is still running the Maple coal mine at Sinai.
Samuel Allen sold a fine cow to Mrs. Mary Garnes last week.
Chas. Sanders has sold his farm to Willie Frick and has moved north.
That poor little soul at Piketon that had so much to say about the editor of THE DEMOCRAT not being loyal to the government and its soldiers ought to have a charm. Johnson was nothing but a school boy during the civil war and the kid editor was not yet born. Say waiving the bloody shirt is stale and no go any more.
Mr. Jacob Wolfe of Hay Hollow has bought the old Leffler Farm over in Beaver Township.
People out here are more than pleased with the result of the late election, even to some of the colored folks.
Squire Ragland sys that Mr. Dougherty said to him, "We will send a man up there and you fellow to work under him election day." Mr. Ragland said we would just not do that a little bit.
Parker Quincel and Malone Sullivan returned from the west in time to vote for Governor Harmon.

14 December 1910 The Democrat

EAST JACKSON

William Yearian of Jackson county brought Mrs. Mirtle Coy home one day last week. Mrs. Coy has been staying for sometime with her son Edgar.
Victor Willis moved to hi new home over in Jackson county on day last week. A. J. Willis and son Willie have been up at Washington cutting corn.
William Sprague has another job of logging for Frank Hartley
Charles Wickline is sowing wheat on Rush Hartley’s farm over in Jackson county.
Pat Murphy is no more, he went to Chillicothe last week came to Richmondale on the
night train, and a short distance from town he lay there all night. When he woke up the next morning he went to Levi Hartley’s and died Tuesday.
Martin Hammon will move from Piketon back to his farm on Hixon Run this fall.
William Maple has rented wheat land from Albert Cotteral and is going to try his luck with the Overly Pool wheat.
Sam Allen and Henry Tucker are back from the north.
Mattie and Laura Wickline came from Jackson county to visit their parents Saturday.
Will Anderson and Maud Sullivan were quietly married last week over at Jackson court house by Squire Frank White.
The Maple Bros. loaded a car with cross ties Saturday at Richmondale.
It is said that a saloon keeper pays ½ cent per glass for beer and sells it for 5 cents so if our merchants made that profit here would be no kick.

26 Oct 1910 The Waverly Democrat

EAST JACKSON

Mrs. T. M. Reisinger, daughter of Rev. Rose sold $30.60 worth of turkeys last week.
Tom Felton of Sinai will soon be studding the history of the Religious bodies of the United States. By the way, Tom is a jolly fellow and a good Democrat.
A stranger came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Hartley a few days ago. They have adopted the young man, named John Wesley after his grand pa Overly and the editor of THE DEMOCRAT. Mr. Overly has already given the boy two young roosters and now if Mr. Johnson will send him THE DEMOCRAT for one year, the young man will vote the Democrat ticket in spite of his pap. (J. W. Hartley, Richmondale, Ohio, R.D. No. 1)
Albert Overly of the Fairview farm killed a large black snake while hunting one day last week. We will probably now here from Joe McCartney over at Jackson.
John Keller had his sale Thanks giving and has moved to Washington C. H. It has been rumored that Jasper Bowman will have a sale soon and follow.
Sam Allen is going to take a hunt when he gets through with his work.
Jack Klice has bought the Ankrom farm.
Billie Sprague is logging for Victor ?
James Hartley and son were in this section one day last week.
Joseph Hartley and Philip Palmer attended the sale at John Kellers.
Since the legislature will be Democratic and a glance at the situation convinces us that the Rose law will not be repealed. Amen.
Albert Overly has killed 63 rabbits since the law came in. Who has beat that record in Pike?
Rev. Geo. Maple of Sinai is building a new house on main.
Our new Democratic neighbor Jas. Creeg has started another huxter wagon on Big Run.
Our mail carrier has been failing for some time to get in for the noon trains which makes it inconvenient for patrons.  
14 Dec 1910 The Waverly Democrat

EAST JACKSON

Mrs. T. M. Reisinger, daughter of Rev. Rose sold $30.60 worth of turkeys last week.
Tom Felton of Sinai will soon be studding the history of the Religious bodies of the United States. By the way, Tom is a jolly fellow and a good Democrat.
A stranger came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Hartley a few days ago. They have adopted the young man, named John Wesley after his grand pa Overly and the editor of THE DEMOCRAT. Mr. Overly has already given the boy two young roosters and now if Mr. Johnson will send him THE DEMOCRAT for one year, the young man will vote the Democrat ticket in spite of his pap. (J. W. Hartley, Richmondale, Ohio, R.D. No. 1)
Albert Overly of the Fairview farm killed a large black snake while hunting one day last week. We will probably now here from Joe McCartney over at Jackson.
John Keller had his sale Thanks giving and has moved to Washington C. H. It has been rumored that Jasper Bowman will have a sale soon and follow.
Sam Allen is going to take a hunt when he gets through with his work.
Jack Klice has bought the Ankrom farm.
Billie Sprague is logging for Victor ?
James Hartley and son were in this section one day last week.
Joseph Hartley and Philip Palmer attended the sale at John Kellers.
Since the legislature will be Democratic and a glance at the situation convinces us that the Rose law will not be repealed. Amen.
Albert Overly has killed 63 rabbits since the law came in. Who has beat that record in Pike?
Rev. Geo. Maple of Sinai is building a new house on main.
Our new Democratic neighbor Jas. Creeg has started another huxter wagon on Big Run.
Our mail carrier has been failing for some time to get in for the noon trains which makes it inconvenient for patrons.  
14 Dec 1910 The Waverly Democrat